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Aug 06 2012

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My Visit With The Yeatmans

by Joe Tursi, Heredia City

If you ever contemplate moving to Costa Rica for whatever reason you will soon find that there are many ex-pats living here who are self-proclaimed experts about all things Costa Rican! Some of these people know what they are talking about but many do not and are simply passing along bad information or, having done something the wrong way, try to pass that same bad info on to you!

However, there are a few people who know what they are talking about and who can give advice out of their very positive experiences here in Costa Rica.  Such are the Yeatmans!  Paul and Gloria Yeatman have lived in Costa Rica for over three years and they continue to do it right; and when they don’t, they learn by their mistakes.  Since I had some Skype contact with them before my move here I thought it would be great to get to know them on my new home turf.

In June, the Yeatmans visited me in my new apartment here in the city of Heredia (see article).  In kindness, they reciprocated by inviting me to spend three days with them, one of which would be a day at the beach at Playa Dona Ana near Caldera.

The Yeatman’s live in Alto Santiago, near the town of San Ramon. They live in a casita that is nestled in the lush greenery of a tropical landscape.  The “little home” is quite ample for them as it contains two bedrooms, bath, kitchen, dining area and living room.  As comfortable and bright as the inside of their casita is, it is the outside that attracted me and was a terrific place to sit and have a beer, and, as we did with visiting neighbors, enjoy a good meal amid the splendor of a tropical paradise!  Gloria is an exceptional cook and a wonderful baker of fine breads!  It was a treat to eat pizza made from scratch and enjoy fresh bread with home-made peanut butter and honey accompanied by a cup of rich Costa Rican coffee for breakfast!

Most of all I enjoyed swapping stories with them about their move here.  They are a wealth of knowledge when it comes to knowing how to do it right and they make well-studied suggestions for a successful move to Costa Rica.  It was fun to talk about our residency processes.  I used the same agency that they did to obtain my residency and, like them, was completely satisfied that I could put all that process in someone else’s hands and have peace of mind that it was being done well.  I received my Pensionado cedula of residency in March through a process that took about 7 months from the time my required papers were gathered together and approved.  This is always a great day to celebrate as an ex-pat: the day you pick up your Residency Cedula card from the Immigration Department in San Jose!

Paul and Gloria are friendly and open people, plain and simple! We had a great time together and I continued to learn more about life in this wonderful little country called Costa Rica.  Paul gave me a tour of San Ramon itself and I had the special treat of going to their local medical clinic where I met his Caja (national health care program) physician, visiting nurse and pharmacist, all serving the local people of that area.  Plus we had lunch at the “famous” Soda Kendy that Paul writes about, where you can get a casado for only a buck!  While that looked ample enough, I opted for the $2.00 platter and was full by the time I finished my plate of rice, beans, chicken, plantains, salad, and fresh fruit juice!  A visit with Paul and Gloria is not complete without eating at this little Soda in the Central Market.

Important!

Our friend, Robert Carr, says about this little Soda: “I’ve always enjoyed going to diners and “greasy spoons” in the US. These places make no pretense about what they are: decent food for working people at a reasonable price.Soda Kendi in San Ramon is the Costa Rican version of this idea. This is a place where regular Ticos eat, and you may find yourself sharing a table with a day labor or a philosophy professor. The interior of the soda is modest but clean, and the food itself is honest and nutritious.  My usual lunch at Soda Kendi costs about $1.60, which is less than what it would cost for me to eat at home.”

Notice

And Paul says, “We’ve been going there several times a week for lunch over the past three years and it’s a busy spot, so the food turns over rapidly. It may not be “great cuisine” but it’s a good, basic casado for very little money. They also have the best Olla de Carne in town, for only 1,200 colones ($2.40). It’s a lo tico!”

Gloria and Paul really enjoy the life they have chosen here in Costa Rica and are willing to help other people, like me, to find the fullness of the experience of this wonderful country where many of us have chosen to live.  If you are reading this then you have found their website and, like me, continue to learn from it.  May it help you to find a piece of the good life also.

Permanent link to this article: http://retireforlessincostarica.com/2012/08/my-visit-with-the-yeatmans/